Bioactive products of cyanobacteria and microalgae as valuable dietary and medicinal supplements

Document Type : Review Article

Authors

1 Assisstant professor, Department of food Hygiene, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran

2 Assisstant professor, Department of Biology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran

3 Assisstant professor, Department of Fisheries, Qeshm Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qeshm, Iran

Abstract

Cyanobacteria and microalgae have great potential to produce a wide variety of biotoxic and non-toxic biologically active compounds and could lead to the development of the food and pharmaceutical industries soon. The commercial proliferation of algae on a large scale is due to their ability to produce a wide range of valuable secondary metabolites such as polyunsaturated monounsaturated fatty acids, polysaccharides, glycerol, glycoproteins, antioxidant compounds, and antibiotics. Today, with the potential spread of bacterial resistance and reduced efficacy of existing antibiotics, researchers are looking to find new antibiotics among the products produced by microalgae. However, many cyanobacterial strains contain toxic compounds that cause the death of many humans and animals. In this review article, an attempt has been made to introduce valuable biologically active products along with various types of cyanotoxins in foods and treatment methods by collecting the latest research. It is hoped that the results of this study could pave the way for the introduction of valuable metabolites produced by cyanobacteria and microalgae in the food and pharmaceutical industries.



TRANSLATE with x

English






Arabic
Hebrew
Polish


Bulgarian
Hindi
Portuguese


Catalan
Hmong Daw
Romanian


Chinese Simplified
Hungarian
Russian


Chinese Traditional
Indonesian
Slovak


Czech
Italian
Slovenian


Danish
Japanese
Spanish


Dutch
Klingon
Swedish


English
Korean
Thai


Estonian
Latvian
Turkish


Finnish
Lithuanian
Ukrainian


French
Malay
Urdu


German
Maltese
Vietnamese


Greek
Norwegian
Welsh


Haitian Creole
Persian
 







//


 

TRANSLATE with

COPY THE URL BELOW

Back


EMBED THE SNIPPET BELOW IN YOUR SITE

Enable collaborative features and customize widget: Bing Webmaster Portal
Back

//



TRANSLATE with x

English






Arabic
Hebrew
Polish


Bulgarian
Hindi
Portuguese


Catalan
Hmong Daw
Romanian


Chinese Simplified
Hungarian
Russian


Chinese Traditional
Indonesian
Slovak


Czech
Italian
Slovenian


Danish
Japanese
Spanish


Dutch
Klingon
Swedish


English
Korean
Thai


Estonian
Latvian
Turkish


Finnish
Lithuanian
Ukrainian


French
Malay
Urdu


German
Maltese
Vietnamese


Greek
Norwegian
Welsh


Haitian Creole
Persian
 







//


 

TRANSLATE with

COPY THE URL BELOW

Back


EMBED THE SNIPPET BELOW IN YOUR SITE

Enable collaborative features and customize widget: Bing Webmaster Portal
Back

//



TRANSLATE with x

English






Arabic
Hebrew
Polish


Bulgarian
Hindi
Portuguese


Catalan
Hmong Daw
Romanian


Chinese Simplified
Hungarian
Russian


Chinese Traditional
Indonesian
Slovak


Czech
Italian
Slovenian


Danish
Japanese
Spanish


Dutch
Klingon
Swedish


English
Korean
Thai


Estonian
Latvian
Turkish


Finnish
Lithuanian
Ukrainian


French
Malay
Urdu


German
Maltese
Vietnamese


Greek
Norwegian
Welsh


Haitian Creole
Persian
 







//


 

TRANSLATE with

COPY THE URL BELOW

Back


EMBED THE SNIPPET BELOW IN YOUR SITE

Enable collaborative features and customize widget: Bing Webmaster Portal
Back

//



TRANSLATE with x

English






Arabic
Hebrew
Polish


Bulgarian
Hindi
Portuguese


Catalan
Hmong Daw
Romanian


Chinese Simplified
Hungarian
Russian


Chinese Traditional
Indonesian
Slovak


Czech
Italian
Slovenian


Danish
Japanese
Spanish


Dutch
Klingon
Swedish


English
Korean
Thai


Estonian
Latvian
Turkish


Finnish
Lithuanian
Ukrainian


French
Malay
Urdu


German
Maltese
Vietnamese


Greek
Norwegian
Welsh


Haitian Creole
Persian
 







//


 

TRANSLATE with

COPY THE URL BELOW

Back


EMBED THE SNIPPET BELOW IN YOUR SITE

Enable collaborative features and customize widget: Bing Webmaster Portal
Back

//



TRANSLATE with x

English






Arabic
Hebrew
Polish


Bulgarian
Hindi
Portuguese


Catalan
Hmong Daw
Romanian


Chinese Simplified
Hungarian
Russian


Chinese Traditional
Indonesian
Slovak


Czech
Italian
Slovenian


Danish
Japanese
Spanish


Dutch
Klingon
Swedish


English
Korean
Thai


Estonian
Latvian
Turkish


Finnish
Lithuanian
Ukrainian


French
Malay
Urdu


German
Maltese
Vietnamese


Greek
Norwegian
Welsh


Haitian Creole
Persian
 







//


 

TRANSLATE with

COPY THE URL BELOW

Back


EMBED THE SNIPPET BELOW IN YOUR SITE

Enable collaborative features and customize widget: Bing Webmaster Portal
Back

//



TRANSLATE with x

English






Arabic
Hebrew
Polish


Bulgarian
Hindi
Portuguese


Catalan
Hmong Daw
Romanian


Chinese Simplified
Hungarian
Russian


Chinese Traditional
Indonesian
Slovak


Czech
Italian
Slovenian


Danish
Japanese
Spanish


Dutch
Klingon
Swedish


English
Korean
Thai


Estonian
Latvian
Turkish


Finnish
Lithuanian
Ukrainian


French
Malay
Urdu


German
Maltese
Vietnamese


Greek
Norwegian
Welsh


Haitian Creole
Persian
 







//


 

TRANSLATE with

COPY THE URL BELOW

Back


EMBED THE SNIPPET BELOW IN YOUR SITE

Enable collaborative features and customize widget: Bing Webmaster Portal
Back

//

Highlights

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keywords

Main Subjects


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • · Abbaspour, S., Nowruzi, B. and Hamdi, S.M.M. (2020). Optimizing the Cultivation Conditions of Fischerella sp. SH. A Cyanobacterium for Maximizing Polysaccharide Production with Antibacterial Activity. Biological Journal of Microorganism, 9 (34): 24-52.
  • · Eghtedari, M., Porzani, S.J. and Nowruzi, B. (2021). Anticancer potential of natural peptides from terrestrial and marine environments: A review.Phytochemistry Letters. 42: 78-103.
  • · Carvalho, L.R., Costa-Neves, A., Conserva, G.A., Brunetti, R.L., Hentschke, G.S., Malone, C.F., et al. (2013). Biologically active compounds from cyanobacteria extracts: in vivo and in vitro aspects. Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia, 23(3): 471-480.
  • · de Amarante, M.C.A., Braga, A.R.C., Sala, L. and Kalil, S.J. (2020). Colour stability and antioxidant activity of C-phycocyanin-added ice creams after in vitro digestion. Food Research International, 137: 109602.
  • · Encarnacao, T., Pais, A.A., Campos, M.G. and Burrows, H.D. (2015). Cyanobacteria and microalgae: a renewable source of bioactive compounds and other chemicals. Science progress, 98(2):145-168.
  • · Eriksen, N.T. (2008). Production of phycocyanin—a pigment with applications in biology, biotechnology, foods and medicine. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 80(1): 1-14.
  • · Gantar, M. and Svirčev, Z. (2008). Microalgae and cyanobacteria: food for thought 1. Journal of phycology, 44(2): 260-268.
  • · Guedes, A.C., Amaro, H.M. and Malcata, F.X. (2011). Microalgae as sources of high added‐value compounds—a brief review of recent work. Biotechnology Progress, 27(3): 597-613.
  • · Andrade, M.A., Barbosa, C.H., Souza, V.G., Coelhoso, I.M., Reboleira, J., Bernardino, S. et al. (2021). Novel active food packaging films based on whey protein incorporated with seaweed extract: development, characterization, and application in fresh poultry meat. Coatings, 11(2): 229.
  • · He, X., Liu, Y.L., Conklin, A., Westrick, J., Weavers, L.K., Dionysiou, D.D., et al. (2016). Toxic cyanobacteria and drinking water: Impacts, detection, and treatment. Harmful algae, 54:174-193.
  • · Jaiswal, P., Singh, P.K. and Prasanna, R. (2008). Cyanobacterial bioactive molecules-an overview of their toxic properties. Canadian Journal of Microbiology, 54(9): 701-717.
  • · Jalili, F., Trigui, H., Guerra Maldonado, J.F., Dorner, S., Zamyadi, A., Shapiro, B.J., et al. (2021). Can cyanobacterial diversity in the source predict the diversity in sludge and the risk of toxin release in a drinking water treatment plant? Toxins, 13(1): 25.
  • · Kultschar, B. and Llewellyn, C. (2018). Secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Secondary Metabolites—Sources and Applications, 64.
  • · Lee, J., Lee, S. and Jiang, X. (2017). Cyanobacterial toxins in freshwater and food: important sources of exposure to humans. Annual Review of Food Science and Technology, 8: 281-304.
  • · Liu, L., Jokela, J., Wahlsten, M., Nowruzi, B., Permi, P., Zhang, Y.Z., et al. (2014). Nostosins, trypsin inhibitors isolated from the terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain FSN. Journal of Natural Products, 77(8): 1784-1790.
  • · Liu, D., Liberton, M., Hendry, J.I., Aminian-Dehkordi, J., Maranas, C.D. and Pakrasi, H.B. (2021). Engineering biology approaches for food and nutrient production by cyanobacteria. Current Opinion in Biotechnology, 67: 1-6.
  • · Martínez-Francés, E. and Escudero-Oñate, C. (2018). Cyanobacteria and microalgae in the production of valuable bioactive compounds. Microalgal Biotechnology, 6: 104-128.
  • · Metcalf, J.S. and Codd, G.A. (2020). Co-occurrence of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins with other environmental health hazards: impacts and implications. Toxins, 12(10): 629.
  • · Mysliwa-Kurdziel, B. and Solymosi, K. (2017). Phycobilins and phycobiliproteins used in food industry and medicine. Mini reviews in medicinal chemistry, 17(13): 1173-1193.
  • · Nicoletti, M., 2016. Microalgae nutraceuticals. Foods, 5(3): 54.
  • · Nowruzi, B., Haghighat, S., Fahimi, H. and Mohammadi, E. (2018). Nostoc cyanobacteria species: a new and rich source of novel bioactive compounds with pharmaceutical potential. Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, 9(1): 5-12.
  • · Nowruzi, B. and Porzani, S.J. (2021). Toxic compounds produced by cyanobacteria belonging to several species of the order Nostocales: A review. Journal of Applied Toxicology, 41(4): 510-548.
  • · Nowruzi, B., Sarvari, G. and Blanco, S. (2020a). The cosmetic application of cyanobacterial secondary metabolites. Algal Research, 49: 101959.
  • · Nowruzi, B., Sarvari, G. and Blanco, S. (2020b). Applications of cyanobacteria in biomedicine. InHandb. Algal Science, Microbiology, Technology, and Medicine: 441-454.
  • · Panjiar, N., Mishra, S., Yadav, A.N. and Verma, P. (2017). Functional foods from cyanobacteria: an emerging source for functional food products of pharmaceutical importance. Microbial Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, 21-37.
  • · Prasanna, R., Sood, A., Jaiswal, P., Nayak, S., Gupta, V., Chaudhary, V., et al. (2010). Rediscovering cyanobacteria as valuable sources of bioactive compounds. Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology, 46(2): 119-134.
  • · Rajabpour, N., Nowruzi, B. and Ghobeh, M. (2019). Investigation of the toxicity, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of some cyanobacterial strains isolated from different habitats. Acta Biologica Slovenica, 62(2): 1-14.
  • · Rezanka, T. and Dembitsky, V.M. (2006). Metabolites produced by cyanobacteria belonging to several species of the family Nostocaceae. Folia Microbiologica, 51(3): 159-182.
  • · Safavi, M., Nowruzi, B., Estalaki, S. and Shokri, M. (2019). Biological Activity of Methanol Extract from Nostoc sp. N42 and Fischerella sp. S29 Isolated from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. International Journal on Algae, 21(4): 373-391.
  • · Sathasivam, R., Radhakrishnan, R., Hashem, A. and Abd_Allah, E.F. (2019). Microalgae metabolites: A rich source for food and medicine. Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences, 26(4): 709-722.
  • · Singh, S., Kate, B.N. and Banerjee, U.C. (2005). Bioactive compounds from cyanobacteria and microalgae: an overview. Critical Reviews in Biotechnology, 25(3): 73-95.
  • · Zahra, Z., Choo, D.H., Lee, H. and Parveen, A. (2020). Cyanobacteria: review of current potentials and applications. Environments, 7(2): 13.
  • · Zanchett, G. and Oliveira-Filho, E.C. (2013). Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins: from impacts on aquatic ecosystems and human health to anticarcinogenic effects. Toxins, 5(10): 1896-1917.